Heart Age

How Does Your Heart Age Compare to Your Actual Age?

Based on the Framingham Heart Study, we’ve created a heart test to help you compare your actual age to your heart’s age. Continue below to learn the history and impact of the Framingham Heart Study, or begin taking the Heart Age test here.

Age is a fairly easy number to calculate. People who know their  birthdays and birth years can easily understand their age. But what about their heart age?

They say age is nothing but a number, and that may be true; however, your heart’s age gives you an idea of how your overall health is doing. It takes a look at various heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking and physical inactivity, along with additional factors like age and gender – to give you a snapshot of your heart health.

So can you guess how old (or young) your heart is? Take the Heart Age Test (heart.mocacare.com) to find out.

If your heart is younger than your actual age, then you’re doing something right! If your heart is older than your actual age, it may be time to make some lifestyle changes.


The Framingham Heart Study

In 1948, under the direction of the National Heart Institute (NHI, but now known as the National, Heart, and Blood Institute or or NHBI), the Framingham Heart Study was created to better understand the general causes of heart disease and stroke. With little known about these issues, researchers recruited over 5,209 men and women between the ages of 30 and 62 from Framingham, Massachusetts. Since 1948, the research participants have continued to contribute to the study every two years through detailed medical history, physical exams and lab tests. In 1971, the Study added the second generation of the participants to contribute.

Throughout the years, careful monitoring of the Framingham Study participants has led to the identification of major heart disease and stroke risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, smoking, obesity, diabetes and physical inactivity, as well as personal factors including age, gender, HDL cholesterol levels, etc.

The Study has conducted over a half century of research and its findings have helped the general public better understand the risks and possible lifestyle tips to help with heart health. As the Framingham Heart Test continues its study, we look forward to the new discoveries for many years to come.

 

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